Directos ABC: Investidura Obama
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Investidura Obama

Investidura Obama

  • Another swearing-in stumble

    21 Jan.  1:20 p.m EST


    Chief Justice John Roberts got it right this time -- but President Barack Obama appeared to stumble over the word "states" during his ceremonial swearing in.

    In front of hundreds of thousands gathered to watch, Obama stammered briefly over "states" as he repeated back the words "the office of president of the United States."


    Obama had already been officially sworn in for a second term on Sunday, in accordance with the Constitution, which requires presidential terms to begin on Jan.
    20.

    In 2009, it was Roberts who famously flubbed Obama's official swearing in.
    As a result of that mistake, Roberts and Obama repeated the presidential oath in a private ceremony to ensure there were no constitutional issues.
    President Barack Obama's family watches during the ceremonial swearing-in at the U.S. Capitol during the 57th Presidential Inauguration in Washington, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
    by Kellen Henry on Jan 21, 2013 at 12:00 PM



  • For some, a quick exit

    21 Jan. 1:22 p.m. EST

    Small streams of people began leaving the National Mall right after President Barack Obama took the oath of office, not staying to hear his inaugural speech.
    Some were making a quick exit to find a good spot along the parade route, while others wanted to get on Metrorail before the trains got too crowded.

    "You make me feel bad," said Twanda Rhodes of Longwood, Fla.
    , when asked why she was leaving. "But it's cold, and we have to catch a train."

    _ Richard Lardner, AP reporter covering foreign affairs and defense on Capitol Hill
    A crowd fills up the National Mall before at the ceremonial swearing-in of President Barack Obama at the U.S. Capitol during the 57th Presidential Inauguration in Washington, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 1:17 PM


  • The 2nd time, a more intimate affair

    21 Jan. 1:24 p.m. EST
    The U.S. Capitol on Inauguration Day. AP Photo/Caleb Jones
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 12:07 PM
    It was altogether a more intimate affair than four years ago. Just a party of untold hundred thousands, chilling in the nation's backyard.

    No match for the staggering masses and adrenaline-pumping energy of his first turn as president on the West Front of the Capitol. But a lively second act.

    Sharon Davis of Suitland, Md., retired after 22 years in the Air Force, said it all made her proud beyond words. "There's a lot of energy here today," she said. "But it doesn't compare to last time, when it was just off the charts."

    _ Calvin Woodward, AP political reporter

  • What's in the words?

    21 Jan. 1:26 p.m. EST

    President Barack Obama's second inaugural address was so broad that in 2,114 words, he repeated only three words more than a dozen times and those words themselves weren't exactly telling but geared toward future collective action.

    The word Obama used most, except for common articles:

    will – 21 times

    us – 20 times

    must – 16 times

    people – 11 times

    •  time – 10 times

    America – 8 times

    together – 7 times 

    country – 7 times 

    make – 7 times.

    Obama was slightly less verbose than four years ago when his speech had 2,385 words, but he emphasized the same words in both addresses. He said "us" 23 times, "will" 17 times, "nation" 12 times, "new" 11 times and "America" nine times.

    Here's a look at some of the common keywords and themes that run through U.S. inaugural addresses since 1900:

    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 17, 2013 at 2:30 PM




  • Americans weigh in on Obama's 2nd term

    21 Jan. 1:35 p.m. EST


    “I think that because of the reluctance of both parties to bring about bipartisan action toward the economy _ certainly everybody is affected by the economy _ I look forward to him bringing the Republicans and Democrats together.  ... I look forward to him bringing about compromising.
    – Beniam Fantu, 34, of Dallas.


    "There are no coincidences. I don't believe there are. This was exactly what was intended, to show how far we have come in our civil freedoms and in our civil rights."
    – Alenda Young, 39, of Chicago, on the inauguration ceremony occurring on Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Young is president of the Monarch Awards Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Xi NU Omega chapter.


    "I think he's a great man. He's trying his best. He did a lot his last period as I think he's going to do a lot more in his next four years."
    – Karen Espinoza, 24, was working at a Hispanic market in Little Rock, Ark., as Obama addressed the nation Monday. She didn't hear the president's speech, but said she was impressed by Obama's efforts on immigration reform.


  • Miss America bundles up, doesn't bail on inauguration

    21 Jan. 1:37  p.m. EST

    Miss America 2013 Mallory Hagan arrives at the OurTime.org Inaugural Youth Ball Generation Now Party on Saturday, Jan. 19, 2013, in Washington. (Photo by Nick Wass/Invision/AP)
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 1:32 PM
    Miss America Mallory Hagan says she made it to the inauguration despite the chilly weather.

    In an interview Saturday, Hagan had said she wasn't sure if she would attend President Barack Obama's public swearing-in ceremony Monday even though she had a ticket because "it's going to be freezing."


    But on Monday she tweeted a photo of herself from the inauguration wrapped in a blue scarf with the words "bundled up!" She later tweeted that she was "proud to be an American."


    Hagan, a 23-year-old Alabama native who lives in New York, won the Miss America title earlier this month.

    _ Mesfin Fekadu, AP entertainment reporter


  • First on the agenda: Nominate cabinet

    21 Jan. 2:07 p.m.

    Minutes after his inauguration speech Monday, President Barack Obama signed documents officially submitting top administration nominations to the Senate.


    Obama affirmed the nominations of:

    • John Brennan to be CIA director
    • former Sen. Chuck Hagel for defense secretary
    • Sen. John Kerry to be secretary of state
    • Jack Lew for treasury secretary

    Obama also signed a proclamation to commemorate the inauguration.
    The proclamation is entitled "National Day of Hope and Resolve, 2013."

    "I'm proclaiming peace on Earth and goodwill towards men," Obama quipped as he signed the document.


    _ Stephen Ohlemacher, AP reporter in Washington


    Nominations for Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass. to be named Secretary of State, left, and for White House Chief of Staff Jacob Lew to be named Treasury Secretary, right, bear President Barack Obama's signature after the president signed them on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013, following the president's ceremonial swearing-in during the 57th Presidential Inauguration. (AP Photo/Jonathan Ernst, Pool)
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 1:55 PM


  • Presidential inaugurations: 1789-1893

    Jan. 21 2:12 p.m. EST
    APRIL 30, 1789: This Currier and Ives print is a reproduction of the scene at Old City Hall in New York as George Washington took oath of office. Left to Right : in foreground, Alexander Hamilton; Chancellor Livingston who administered the oath; Roger Sherman; secretary Otis of the Senate; Washington; John Adams; Baron Stueben; and General Knox. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:31 PM
    MARCH 4, 1829: This artist's rendition shows the crush of people after President Andrew Jackson's inaugural ceremony, held on the East Portico of the Capitol building for the first time, in Washington, D.C.. Following the inaugural proceedings, more than 20,000 well-wishers came to the White House to meet President Jackson. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:33 PM
    MARCH 4, 1841: This is an artist's impression of President William Henry Harrison's inauguration in Washington, D.C. Harrison declined the offer of a closed carriage and rode on horseback to the Capitol, braving cold temperatures and a northeast wind. After speaking for more than an hour, he returned to the White House on horseback, catching a chill that eventually turned to pneumonia. He died a month later. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:35 PM
    MARCH 4, 1857: President James Buchanan delivers his address after being sworn in as the 15th president of the United States in front of the Capitol in Washington, D.C.. The oath was administered by Chief Justice Roger B. Taney. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:39 PM
    MARCH 4, 1861: U.S. President Abraham Lincoln stands under cover at center of the Capitol steps during his inauguration in Washington, D.C.. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:41 PM
    MARCH 4, 1865: Abraham Lincoln's second inauguration is depicted in this painting as he takes the oath of office as the 16th president of the United States in front of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. The oath is administered by Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:43 PM
    MARCH 4, 1869: Ulysses S. Grant takes the oath of office as the 18th President of the United States. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:44 PM
    MARCH 5, 1877: The public inauguration of Rutherford B. Hayes takes place in front of the U.S. Capitol on the East Portico in Washington, D.C. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:46 PM
    MARCH 4, 1881: President James A. Garfield takes the oath of office administered by Supreme Court Justice Noah H. Swayne. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:47 PM
    MARCH 4, 1889: Benjamin Harrison is sworn in as the 23rd president of the United States as he takes the oath of office administered by Chief Justice Melville W. Fuller on the east portico of the Capitol building in Washington, D.C. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 3:57 PM
    MARCH 4, 1893: President Grover Cleveland reads his inaugural address from the steps of the Capitol building in Washington, D.C. President Cleveland was sworn in as the 24th president of the United States in a ceremony administered by Chief Justice Melville W. Fuller. (AP Photo)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 7, 2013 at 4:09 PM
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  • AP PHOTOS: Presidential shades of gray

    21 Jan. 2:23 p.m. EST

    How much does four years in the Oval Office age the follicles? Here's a look at shifting shades of the three most recent presidents: 

     President Barack Obama at the beginning (left) and end (right) of his first term
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 18, 2013 at 6:19 PM
    President George W. Bush in the first term (left) and second term (right) 
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 18, 2013 at 6:19 PM
    President Bill Clinton in the first term (left) and second term (right)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 18, 2013 at 6:20 PM
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  • Today's event: Real, pseudo or something else?

    21 Jan. 2:28 p.m.
    President Barack Obama speaks at the ceremonial swearing-in at the U.S. Capitol during the 57th Presidential Inauguration in Washington, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh) 
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 21, 2013 at 11:50 AM


    Ted Anthony,
    AP's editor-at-large and frequent writer about American culture, looks at the meaning of today's inauguration.

    A half-century ago, Daniel J. Boorstin, one of the country's most famous historians, coined the term "pseudo-event" an event that happens for the sole purpose of being watched. "The celebration is held, photographs are taken, the occasion is widely reported," he wrote.

    That was today's presidential inauguration
    right down to the letter.

    So much of politics is a scripted affair already. Much of what is done by politicians and those who govern is designed to be "on message," to "play to the base" or "stick to the talking points." Speeches are written by five, 10, 20 people and then emerge from the mouth of one. It's hard to determine precisely what is accomplished and what is, for lack of a better term, "accomplished."

    Even in the realm of scripted affairs, though, this was noteworthy: It was the scripted version of a scripted version. A pseudo-pseudo-event. The actual inauguration took place Sunday in the relative privacy of the White House because the actual Inauguration Day fell on a Sunday. Today's public version contained thousands of people, lots of dressed-up dignitaries on stage, Supreme Court justices and an oath of office that, from a legal standpoint, meant nothing.

    When it comes to the American identity, of course, we need and savor these events. They invoke national themes and foster pride. They tell us: Continuity exists, the nation goes on. They give the president an opportunity to deliver a real message amid all the careful calibration.

    But as Americans consider this day, it's worth considering how very American, too, is the scripted event that took place in front of their capitol and on their television, video and smartphone screens. And you might ask: In the end, which one was the real event?

  • A vehicle for change: Obama gets DC 'Taxation' license plates

    21 Jan. 3:37 p.m EST

    A presidential vehicle, parked outside the White House in Washington, Saturday, Jan. 19, 2013, sports Washington's "Taxation Without Representation" license plate. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 3:33 PM
    P
    resident Barack Obama's limousine is now carrying the District of Columbia's symbolic "Taxation Without Representation" license plate, a subtle, but some say important, protest over the city's lack of a voting member in Congress, during the inauguration.

    The White House says Obama has seen firsthand "how patently unfair it is for families in D.C. to work hard, raise children and pay taxes, without having a vote in Congress."

  • Presidential parade under way

    21 Jan. 3:46 p.m. EST

    The inaugural parade is under way, with strains of American composer John Philip Sousa and `Yankee Doodle'. The motorcade is proceeding down Washington's wide boulevards as spectators line the streets and cheer. Many are straining to see inside the presidential limousine for a glimpse of the president and first lady.

    Secret  Service agents are striding alongside the slow-moving motorcade, which is rolling along the middle of Pennsylvania Avenue just blocks from the White House. The wide boulevards, cleared of all traffic and spectators, feel even more imposing and grand without their usual gridlock and stop-start
    traffic.
    President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama ride in the presidential limousine during the 57th Presidential Inauguration parade Monday, Jan. 21, 2013, in Washington. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 21, 2013 at 3:45 PM


  • Many TV networks pause for inauguration, MTV opts for "Catfish"

    21 Jan. 3:43 p.m. EST

    Richard Smith watches President Barack Obama deliver his inaugural address during the ceremonial swearing-in, on a television at a Best Buy department store in Springfield, Ill., Monday, Jan. 21, 2013. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman)
    by ccarlson on Jan 21, 2013 at 3:09 PM

    ABC, CBS, NBC and the cable news networks cast aside regular programming Monday to carry the ceremonial swearing-in and Obama's inaugural address. It didn't carry the same attention Obama's first inaugural did. In 2009, even ESPN and MTV covered the swearing-in. This year, ESPN stuck to talk about the upcoming Super Bowl and MTV aired "Catfish: The TV Show."

    Obama's inaugural address lasted about 18 minutes, only slightly longer than the inaugural poem, but shorter than the evaluations of on-air pundits.


    _ David Bauder, AP Television Writer

  • Presidential strut is iconic inaugural moment

    21 Jan. 3:47 p.m. EST

    Pennsylvania Avenue becomes America's red carpet on inauguration day, and
    the president and first lady are the only celebrities on it. It's a tradition that dates to President Jimmy Carter. Ronald Reagan is the only modern president to skip the walk. Reagan and his wife, Nancy, stuck their heads out of their limo's sun roof during part of the drive in 1981, and the parade for his second inauguration was canceled because of cold weather. Here's a slideshow of newly sworn in presidents making the stroll:

    President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama walk down Pennsylvania Avenue during the 57th Presidential Inauguration parade Monday, Jan. 21, 2013, in Washington. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
    by Kellen Henry on Jan 21, 2013 at 4:05 PM
    President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama on Jan. 20, 2009. (AP Photo/Doug Mills, File, Pool)
    by kmahabiron Jan 15, 2013 at 3:33 PM
    President Jimmy Carter and first lady Rosalynn Carter on Jan. 20, 1977. (AP Photo, File)
    by kmahabiron Jan 15, 2013 at 3:22 PM
    President Bill Clinton and first lady Hillary Clinton on January 20, 1993. (AP Photo/Doug Mills)
    by kmahabiron Jan 15, 2013 at 3:29 PM
    President George Bush and first lady Laura Bush on Jan. 20, 2001. (AP Photo/Doug Mills)
    by kmahabiron Jan 15, 2013 at 5:50 PM
    President George H. W. Bush and first lady Barbara Bush on Jan. 20, 1989. (AP Photo/Dennis Cook)
    by kmahabiron Jan 15, 2013 at 5:47 PM
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  • Also on parade, the Obama 'brand'

    21 Jan. 3:52 p.m. EST

    Luci Brown of South Bend, Ind., looks at the floats prepared for the 57th Presidential Inaugural Parade, Sunday, Jan. 20, 2013 in Washington. Thousands are planning to march in the 57th Presidential Inauguration parade after the ceremonial swearing-in of President Barack Obama on Monday. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
    by Jaime Holguin on Jan 21, 2013 at 3:50 PM


    The Barack Obama "brand" was on full display along the parade route as fans waited for the president to travel from Capitol Hill to the White House.


    Many wore Obama T-shirts, ski caps, hoodies and buttons.

    One woman wrapped herself in an Obama beach towel for extra warmth.
    A popular item was the canvas tote bag with pictures of the Obama family on the front and back. Some waved small flags with Obama's likeness on them.

    _ Sam Hananel and Darlene Superville, AP reporters in Washington, D.C.
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